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Tuesday, May 02, 2017

They Laughed At Carrie, Too

My favorite House Mama is still at it!

It is hard to believe this is happening, but it’s real: The US Department of Justice is literally prosecuting a woman for laughing at now–Attorney General Jeff Sessions during his Senate confirmation hearing earlier this year.

According to Ryan Reilly at HuffPost, Code Pink activist Desiree Fairooz was arrested in January after she laughed at a claim from Sen. Richard Shelby (R-AL) that Sessions’s history of “treating all Americans equally under the law is clear and well-documented.”

Sessions, in fact, has a long history of opposing the equal treatment of all Americans under the law. He has repeatedly criticized the historic Voting Rights Act. He voted against hate crime legislation that protected LGBTQ people, arguing, “Today, I'm not sure women or people with different sexual orientations face that kind of discrimination. I just don't see it.” And his nomination for a position as a federal judge was rejected in the 1980s after he was accused of making racist remarks, including a supposed joke that he thought the Ku Klux Klan “was okay until I found out they smoked pot.”

Given this history, Fairooz laughed at Shelby’s claim.

I admit that this story made me wax nostalgiac for the olden days when I'd Amtrak down to DC.  Which is weird because back then, I thought Bush was the worst thing that ever happened in my lifetime...how wrong I was.

ntodd

May 2, 2017 in Constitution, Schmonstitution, Pax Americana | Permalink | Comments (1)

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Sunday, April 16, 2017

We were the very first that revolted, and we are the last to fight against them

 The Romans had laid siege on an ancient fortress for a really long time.  Built a ramp.  Broke down the walls on April 16, 73CE.  Found a bunch of dead Sicarii:

[T]hey then held fast the same resolution, without wavering, which they had upon the hearing of Eleazar's speech, while yet every one of them still retained the natural passion of love to themselves and their families, because the reasoning they went upon appeared to them to be very just, even with regard to those that were dearest to them; for the husbands tenderly embraced their wives, and took their children into their arms, and gave the longest parting kisses to them, with tears in their eyes.

Yet at the same time did they complete what they had resolved on, as if they had been executed by the hands of strangers; and they had nothing else for their comfort but the necessity they were in of doing this execution, to avoid that prospect they had of the miseries they were to suffer from their enemies. Nor was there at length any one of these men found that scrupled to act their part in this terrible execution, but every one of them despatched his dearest relations.

Miserable men indeed were they! whose distress forced them to slay their own wives and children with their own hands, as the lightest of those evils that were before them. So they being not able to bear the grief they were under for what they had done any longer, and esteeming it an injury to those they had slain, to live even the shortest space of time after them, they presently laid all they had upon a heap, and set fire to it.

They then chose ten men by lot out of them to slay all the rest; every one of whom laid himself down by his wife and children on the ground, and threw his arms about them, and they offered their necks to the stroke of those who by lot executed that melancholy office; and when these ten had, without fear, slain them all, they made the same rule for casting lots for themselves, that he whose lot it was should first kill the other nine, and after all should kill himself.

Accordingly, all these had courage sufficient to be no way behind one another in doing or suffering; so, for a conclusion, the nine offered their necks to the executioner, and he who was the last of all took a view of all the other bodies, lest perchance some or other among so many that were slain should want his assistance to be quite despatched, and when he perceived that they were all slain, he set fire to the palace, and with the great force of his hand ran his sword entirely through himself, and fell down dead near to his own relations.

So these people died with this intention, that they would not leave so much as one soul among them all alive to be subject to the Romans. Yet was there an ancient woman, and another who was of kin to Eleazar, and superior to most women in prudence and learning, with five children, who had concealed themselves in caverns under ground, and had carried water thither for their drink, and were hidden there when the rest were intent upon the slaughter of one another.

Those others were nine hundred and sixty in number, the women and children being withal included in that computation. This calamitous slaughter was made on the fifteenth day of the month Xanthicus [Nisan].

They believed that "a glorious death is preferable to a life of infamy."  Which is why this story usually brings to mind Gandhi's oft-criticized suggestion of what European Jews should have done during WWII (as recounted by Louis Fischer in Gandhi and Stalin):

"I [do] not believe in passive resistance.  Satyagraha is something very active.  It is the reverse of passive.  Submission is passive and I dislike submission.  The Jews of Germany made the mistake of submitting to Hitler."
...
"Hitler," Gandhi solemnly affirmed, "killed five million Jews.  It is the greatest crime of our time.  But the Jews should have offered themselves to the butcher's knife.  They should have thrown themselves into the sea from cliffs.  I believe in hari-kiri.  I do not believe in its militaristic connotations, but it is a heroic method."
...
"[That] would have been heroism.  It would have aroused the world and the people of Germany to the evils of Hitler's violence, especially in 1938, before the war.  As it is they succumbed anyway in their millions."

There were probably other forms of resistance that Jews and Europeans could have employed, but Gandhi's motto was "do or die" and as I've noted before, he even advocated the unthinkable:

[N]on-violence has to be non-violence of the brave and the strong. It must come from inward conviction. I have, therefore, not hesitated to say that it is better to be violent if there is violence in our breasts than to put on the cloak of non-violence to cover impotence. Violence is any day preferable to impotence. There is hope for a violent man to become non-violent. There is no such hope for the impotent.

The Mahatma hated impotence and passivity even more than violence.  Suicide is, at the very least, active--doing and dying.  So Happy Masada Day! 

ntodd

April 16, 2017 in Pax Americana | Permalink | Comments (0)

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Friday, April 14, 2017

Reverse PsyOps?

Yes, I'm sure Lord Dampnut and HIS military dropped the FOAD to rattle North Korea.  I'm not sure it will have the desired impact, but rather might convince the DPRK that their nuke/missile programs are even more important than ever, not to mention their usual strategy of brinkmanship.  But at least somebody got to wave his dick around, as promised.

ntodd

April 14, 2017 in Pax Americana | Permalink | Comments (0)

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Friday, April 07, 2017

He Can Only Become Presidential When He Launches Beautiful Rockets With Red Glares


MAGA.

ntodd

April 7, 2017 in Pax Americana | Permalink | Comments (0)

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When the chemical weapons start flying, I don't know if I want a Quaker doing my fighting for me.

10 years ago I wrote about General Mud, war, and rackets.  Very soon that gum I like is going to come back in style...

ntodd

April 7, 2017 in Pax Americana | Permalink | Comments (0)

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Sunday, March 12, 2017

Sometimes big things start with a mere handful of mud

On March 12, 1930, Mahatma Gandhi gave some parting remarks at Chandola lake to those who came to see his party off as they began the Salt March:

There were rumours of my arrest last night. God is great, mysterious indeed are His ways. I am here to say good-bye to you. But even if I were in prison, with your strength I could come back...

[B]e prepared to offer yourselves as civil resisters. Let there be no flinching. Your way at present, however, lies homeward; mine straight on to the sea-coast. You cannot accompany me at present, but you will have an opportunity to accompany me in a different sense later. . . .

The purpose of the March and this satyagraha was, in part, to break the British monopoly on salt manufacture through a form of economic non-cooperation (Method 90: Revenue Refusal).  By making their own salt, Indians would deny a small, symbolic amount of tax monies to the Raj in defiance of an unjust law that was part of the larger injustice of occupation.

By itself, that action wouldn't amount to much, so Gandhi had to generate what we'd call buzz today--without social media, no less--hence the March.  It generated popular interest in every locality his party passed through, and the media propagated the message far and wide.

Before embarking on this first stage of the satyagraha, Gandhi wrote to the Viceroy, Lord Irwin on March 2:

I know that in embarking on non-violence I shall be running what might fairly be termed a mad risk. But the victories of truth have never been won without risks, often of the gravest character. Conversion of a nation that has consciously or unconsciously preyed I know that in embarking on non-violence I shall be running what might fairly be termed a mad risk. But the victories of truth have never been won without risks, often of the gravest character. Conversion of a nation that has consciously or unconsciously preyed. 
...
[I]f you cannot see your way to deal with these evils and my letter makes no appeal to your heart, on the 11th day of this month,1 I shall proceed with such co-workers of the Ashram as I can take, to disregard the provisions of the salt laws. I regard this tax to be the most iniquitous of all from the poor man’s standpoint. As the independence movement is essentially for the poorest in the land the beginning will be made with this evil. The wonder is that we have submitted to the cruel monopoly for so long.

It is, I know, open to you to frustrate my design by arresting me. I hope that there will be tens of thousands ready, in a disciplined manner, to take up the work after me, and, in the act of disobeying the Salt Act to lay themselves open to the penalties of a law that should never have disfigured the Statute-book.

It might seem odd at first blush to alert the authorities that you plan on breaking the law, but civil resistance is all about letting the people in power know what you're doing and why.  That way they can either amend their ways or be provoked into counterproductive actions that undermine their authority and give power to the resisters.

A few days before the March ended in Dandi, spoke at a prayer meeting:

Another piece of information that I have received is that the Government intends to use fire-engines to stop us. We have prepared ourselves for death from cannons and guns, compared to which this is nothing. Of course, even with jets of water, the Government can kill us through torture. It is certainly painful. However, you must bear in mind that not one of us will retreat. I do not think the Government will be so cruel, but we must be prepared.

The March arrived at Dandi on April 5:

That I have reached here is in no small measure due to the power of peace and non-violence: that power is universally felt. The Government may, if it wishes, congratulate itself on acting as it has done, for it could have arrested every one of us. In saying that it did not have the courage to arrest this army of peace, we praise it. It felt ashamed to arrest such an army. He is a civilized man who feels ashamed to do anything which his neighbours would disapprove. The Government deserves to be congratulated on not arresting us, even if it desisted only from fear of world opinion.

Tomorrow we shall break the salt tax law. Whether the Government will tolerate that is a different question. It may not tolerate it, but it deserves congratulations on the patience and forbearance it has displayed in regard to this party.

If the civil disobedience movement becomes widespread in the country and the Government tolerates it, the salt law may be taken as abolished. I have no doubt in my mind that the salt tax stood abolished the very moment that the decision to break the salt laws was reached and a few men took the pledge to carry on the movement even at the risk of their lives till swaraj was won.

If the Government tolerates the impending civil disobedience you may take it for certain that the Government, too, has resolved to abolish this tax sooner or later. If they arrest me or my companions tomorrow, I shall not be surprised, I shall certainly not be pained. It would be absurd to be pained if we get something that we have invited on ourselves.

Then on April 6 (as reported by The Bombay Chronicle):

When they made a beginning in the morning he had himself picked up more mud than salt, but after washing and cleaning he could get two tolas of pure quality which was sufficient for his day’s requirements. That was only a beginning but that signified great things.

In an interview, Gandhi suggested everybody ought to engage in this civil disobedience:

Now that a technical or ceremonial breach of the salt law has been committed, it is now open to anyone who would take the risk of prosecution under the salt law to manufacture salt wherever he wishes and wherever it is convenient.

My advice is that a worker should everywhere manufacture salt and where he knows how to prepare clean salt should make use of it and instruct villagers to do likewise, telling the villagers at the same time that he runs the risk of being prosecuted. In other words the villagers should be fully instructed as to the incidence of salt tax and the manner of breaking laws and regulations in connection with it, so as to have the salt tax repealed and it should be made absolutely clear to the villagers that this breach is to be open and in no way stealthy.

This condition being known they may manufacture salt or help themselves to salt manufactured by nature in creeks and pits near the seashore, to use it for themselves and for their cattle and to sell it to those who will buy it, it being well und- erstood that all such people are committing a breach of the salt law and therefore running the risk of prosecution or even without prosecution to be subjected by the so-called salt officers to harassment. Thus the war against salt tax should be continue...

Gandhi was not arrested yet.  That would happen a bit later when the satyagrahis escalated, announcing their nonviolent raid on the Dharasana saltworks.  But this was a real turning point in the struggle, massively mobilizing the Indian people while not alienating more moderate members of the Indian National Congress.

Wonder how we could turn outrage on social media into something as effective...

ntodd

March 12, 2017 in Pax Americana | Permalink | Comments (0)

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Friday, March 10, 2017

Restraint is the law of our being.

On the same date that Gandhi wrote in Young India about non-violence in March '22, he instructed people what to do in case he was arrested:

The rumour has been revived that my arrest is imminent. It is said to be regarded as a mistake by some officials that I was not arrested when I was to be...It is said, too, that it is now no longer possible for the Government to withstand the ever-rising agitation in London for my arrest and deportation. I myself cannot see how the Government can avoid arresting me if they want a permanent abandonment of civil disobedience, whether individual or mass.

I advised the Working Committee to suspend mass civil disobedience...becauae that disobedience would not have been civil, and if I am now advising all provincial workers to suspend even individual civil disobedience, it is because I know that any disobedience at the present stage will be not civil but criminal. A tranquil atmosphere is an indispensable condition of civil disobedience. It is humiliating for me to discover that there is a spirit of violence abroad and that the Government of the United Provinces has been obliged to enlist additional police...

He also admonished his followers to not engage in any demonstrations or hartal upon his arrest, nor should they revive mass civil disobedience, and they should strictly adhere to the principles of non-violence.  

Gandhi was, in fact, arrested at Ahmedabad late at night on today's date, under Section 124 of the Indian Penal Code.  His parting words were that "all who bore patriotism and love for India should strain every nerve to propagate peace and goodwill all over India, among all communities."

The authorities charged Gandhi with sedition for writing three articles in Young India:

Fans of Attenborough's movie might remember a stirring court scene that encapsulated the "Great Trial" which ended with this statement (necessarily summarized in the film) on March 18:

I know that I was playing with fire. I ran the risk, and if I were set free I would still do the same. Nonviolence is the first article of my faith. It is also last article of my creed. I know that my people have sometimes gone mad. I am sorry for it. Their crime consisted in the love of their country.

I am here to submit not to a light penalty but to the highest Penalty. In my opinion, non-cooperation with evil is as much a duty as is cooperation with good Nonviolence implies voluntary submission to the penalty for non-co-operation with evil. I am here to invite and submit cheerfully to the highest penalty that can be the inflected upon me for what in law is a deliberated crime and what appears to me be the highest duty of a citizen.

The only cause open to, judge, is either to resign post and thus dissociate yourself from evil if you feel that the law you are called upon to administer is evil and that I am innocent or to inflict on me the severest penalty, if you believe that the system and the law you are assisting to administer are good for the people of this country and that my activity is therefore injurious to the public weal.

He was sentenced to six years in prison, though he was released early because of illness (he was 53 at that point and had an appendectomy two years into his prison term).  How much restraint can Trump supporters show?

ntodd

March 10, 2017 in Pax Americana | Permalink | Comments (0)

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Friday, February 17, 2017

#throwbackthursdayonfriday


Dunno if I'll ever put on Trump's head like I did Bush's back in my Code Pink days...

ntodd

February 17, 2017 in Pax Americana | Permalink | Comments (0)

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Monday, February 13, 2017

That Shit'll Never Work In The Trump Era

It began on this date:

The genius and fearlessness of Rev. James Lawson and the young men and women who followed him are the touchstones of this pivotal chapter of the American civil rights struggle. Inspired by his studies in India of Gandhi's work, as well as the Montgomery, Alabama bus boycott led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., Lawson begins in 1960 to train black and white college students in nonviolent methods to desegregate downtown Nashville, Tennessee. The students stage a sit-in at segregated city lunch counters in February 1960.

First they are ignored, but when they return again and again, they are beaten and jailed. The resulting outrage in the African American community leads to a boycott of downtown stores; many whites stay away as well, disturbed by the brutality and disruption. Business leaders apply pressure for a political solution, and bombing of a prominent black lawyer's house prompts the students to march on city hall and confront the mayor. After he is forced to admit that segregation is wrong, Nashville begins to desegregate.

Following on the heels of Greensboro, this series of actions provides yet another example of how people can collectively resist evil.  Care to try again?

ntodd

February 13, 2017 in Pax Americana | Permalink | Comments (1)

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Tuesday, January 31, 2017

We're Playing Into The Giant Puppets' [SIC] Hands!

I do enjoy a good argument againt ever resisting fascism.  Really, it's never a good time to protest and always a better idea to keep one's powder drier than a good martini.

ntodd

January 31, 2017 in Pax Americana | Permalink | Comments (0)

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Tuesday, January 24, 2017

That Shit'll Never Work Here

People Power can work against the worst dictator. Why couldn't it in a country governed by a Snowflake who lost the popular vote?  We all too busy on social media?

ntodd

January 24, 2017 in Pax Americana | Permalink | Comments (0)

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Saturday, January 21, 2017

A Day Of Prayer And Fasting Would Be Yuge

I'm heartened by all the massive marches and traffic shutdowns today, including in Mount Peculiar.  Imagine if all the people who turned out for this protest called in sick on a particular day?

I remember the heady days of 2007 when Monkeyfister and I were pushing for a general strike.  Sadly, the rest of the nation didn't follow our lead, but you know, I get it.  It can be hard to imagine collective action when we couldn't even get the most popular candidate elected.

Yet, we could learn from the Greeks and the Indians and the Germans.  We don't even need to do everything in concert, just so long as people choose one arc of escalation or another.  We just can't let today be the end, but rather the beginning.

ntodd

January 21, 2017 in Pax Americana | Permalink | Comments (0)

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Friday, January 20, 2017

We hung up our lyres


How can we sing?

ntodd

January 20, 2017 in Pax Americana | Permalink | Comments (0)

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Thursday, January 19, 2017

Protest: You're Doing It Wrong

Seriously, the Giant Puppets are why we have Trump, so you damned hippies get outta my First Amendment Zone.  Oddly enough, "are you marching?" was a common question amongst my colleagues this week in Boston...

ntodd

January 19, 2017 in Pax Americana | Permalink | Comments (2)

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Wednesday, January 11, 2017

What Is This, Pre-Nazi Germany?

Let the Ruhrkampf be our guide.  From Gene Sharp's paper on civilian-based defense:

Probably the first case in history of nonviolent resistance as official government policy against a foreign invasion was the German struggle in the Ruhr against the French and Belgian occupation in 1923. The Ruhr struggle is especially complex and covers the period from January 11 to September 26,1923...The French and Belgian invasion was launched to secure scheduled payments of reparations (following the First World War) despite Germany's extreme financial difficulties and to gain other political objectives (such as separation of the Rhineland from Germany).

The occupation was met by the Germans with a policy of noncooperation, which had been decided upon only days before the actual invasion. There had been no preparation, but the resistance was to be fi- nanced by the German government...

Actual noncooperation against the invasion forces developed gradually. The means included the refusal to obey orders of the occupation forces; nonviolent acts of defiance; the refusal of mine owners to serve the invaders; massive demonstrations at courts during trials of resist- ers; the refusal of German policemen to salute foreign officials; the refusal of German workers to run the railroads for the French; the dismantling of railroad equipment; the refusal of shopkeepers to sell to foreign soldiers; the refusal of ordinary people, even when hungry, to use occupation-organized soup kitchens; defiant publication of news- papers in spite of many bans; posting of resistance proclamations and posters; and refusal to mine coal.

Repression was severe...Resistance was complicated by various types of sabotage, including demolitions, which sometimes killed occupation personnel...Widespread unemployment and hunger were severe problems along with continuing extraordinary inflation. The unity of resistance, and to a large extent even the will to resist, was finally broken.

On September 26, the German government called off the noncooperation campaign, but the sufferings of the population increased. Complex negotiations occurred...

Belgians widely protested against their govemment's actions. Some French people became advocates for the Germans, called advocats des boches. Toward the end of 1923, Poincare admitted to the French National Assembly that his policies had failed. Germany could not claim victory, but the invaders finally withdrew, and the Rhineland was not detached from Germany. The invaders had achieved neither their economic nor their political objectives.

Britain and the United States intervened and secured a restructuring of reparations payments. The Dawes Plan was developed to deal with reparations, occupation costs, and German financial solvency, and provided a loan to Germany--all on the assumption that Germany would remain united.

Occupation forces were all withdrawn by June 1925.

Don't cooperate with Putin's Amerika.  Force the kinky occupiers to withdraw.

ntodd

January 11, 2017 in Pax Americana | Permalink | Comments (0)

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Wednesday, December 14, 2016

most of the working and paying and living and dying in this community

My awesome company, part of the change we need, in Fortune:

[H]ealth is affected by plenty of factors beyond insurance coverage and the way that medical providers treat patients. And that's why Trump's choices to lead other critical, if less high-profile, organizations like the Department of Agriculture (USDA) and the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) may also harbor consequences for Americans' wellness.

That's because access to basic social needs like heating, electricity, food, and medicine can play a significant role in health outcomes, according to a new study published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. 

The nonprofit group Health Leads—which screens patients for these very necessities and works to provide them with assistance through community organizations—teamed up with Massachusetts General Hospital to assess how much these factors could affect health. The results were striking: of 1,774 patients who visited various Massachusetts General primary care facilities over about a year and a half and were found to have unmet social needs, 1,021 wound up participating in Health Leads' program—and these patients actually saw an improvement in both their blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

Like climate change, dealing with human heath is a bit more complicated than certain people realize.  But is it really hard to understand that Americans might be healthier if they had access to shelter, food, transportation, etc?

ntodd

December 14, 2016 in Family Life, Pax Americana | Permalink | Comments (0)

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Wednesday, December 07, 2016

Such A Nasty Woman

Political courage:

In 1916, four years before women nationwide won the right to vote, Montana’s Jeannette Rankin—the first woman elected to Congress—captured a House seat. (Montana granted women the vote in 1914.) A fighter for woman suffrage, the dedicated pacifist also was among 50 House members opposing U.S. entry into World War I.

Rankin narrowly lost a race for the Senate in 1918 but returned to the House in 1941. That December, as Pearl Harbor still smoldered from the Japanese attack, Rankin cast the sole vote against war. “As a woman I can’t go to war,” she said, “and I refuse to send anyone else.” After the vote, Rankin had to barricade herself in a phone booth until the Capitol Police escorted her to safety.

“Man-on-the-Street” interviews were not kind:

A Madison, Wisconsin, woman alluded to Ms. Rankin without mentioning her name:

"I believe that American womanhood, as a whole, feels ashamed and humiliated that our one woman representative in Congress kept the vote to declare war form being unanimous."

From "Man-on-the-Street", Madison, Wisconsin, December 9, 1941 (AFS 6367A)

Another woman from Madison said

"I certainly was burned up when Miss Rankin gave all her male colleagues an opportunity to say "just like a woman." Because there's a lot of us who haven't had sheltered lives. We've been out and met life in a hard way and we are resolute and military as our British sisters."

From "Man-on-the-Street", Madison, Wisconsin, December 9, 1941 (AFS 6367B)

But even some folks who disagreed with her were in awe:

In response to that vote, the renowned editor William Allen White wrote an editorial in the Emporia Gazette:

"Rudyard Kipling coined the phrase: 'The female of the species is more deadly than the male.' Well, look at Jeannette Rankin. Probably a hundred men in Congress would have liked to do what she did. Not one of them had the courage to do it. The Gazette entirely disagrees with the wisdom of her position. But, Lord, it was a brave thing! And its bravery someway discounted its folly.

When, in a hundred years from now, courage, sheer courage based upon moral indignation, is celebrated in this country, the name of Jeannette Rankin, who stood firm in folly for her faith, will be written in monumental bronze not for what she did but for the way she did it."

Amen.

ntodd

PS--More on Rankin in Women who Speak for Peace.

December 7, 2016 in Pax Americana | Permalink | Comments (0)

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Sunday, December 04, 2016

Giant Puppets: How Do They Work?

Indeed, it doesn't work all the time (when does any human endeavor?).  But perhaps people will find some constructive lessons from Standing Rock about direct action instead of saying "that shit only worked in the 60s"...

ntodd

December 4, 2016 in Pax Americana | Permalink | Comments (0)

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Sunday, November 27, 2016

You Know, I've Never Seen Donald Trump And Slobodan Milošević In The Same Room Together

One hopes that people start studying Otpor and their success in Serbia against DJT's twin.  Because we gotta learn a lot of shit pretty quickly...

ntodd

November 27, 2016 in Pax Americana | Permalink | Comments (0)

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We Covenant and Combine ourselves together in a Civil Body Politic

I've said it before, and I'll say it again: we're all responsible for the Republic, and have myriad ways to do the necessary work defending it.  It's more important than ever that we don't normalize Trump, but rather organize against him.

ntodd

November 27, 2016 in Pax Americana | Permalink | Comments (1)