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Monday, November 23, 2015

Freedom Of Speech Isn't Free

Oh, Dr Rocket Surgeon:

After a brief moment near the top of the Republican field, Ben Carson’s numbers have been on the decline. Clearly feeling the pressure to say something crazy enough to outdo professional lunatic Donald Trump, Carson just went full-fascist. And you never go full-fascist.

Having already admitted that he likes the idea of keeping American Muslims (and foreigners) in databases to be watched, Carson seems to be warming to expanding that surveillance to other groups he doesn’t like. At a rally in Columbia, South Carolina, Carson dropped the bombshell that he believes any “anti-American” group should be monitored.

“What I have said is that I would be in favor of monitoring a mosque or any church or any organization or any school or any press corps where there was a lot of radicalization and things that were anti-American.”

As recently as October, Carson was suggesting that there needs to be a ban on “liberal” speech on college campuses.

“I actually have something I would use the Department of Education to do,” Carson remarked. “It would be to monitor our institutions of higher education for extreme political bias and deny federal funding if it exists.”

His own supporters told him that was dangerously close to censorship, so he assured them that he didn’t mean right-wing speech, he was talking about liberalism.

Don't forget to monitor Quakers.  Those fucking Quakers.  Anyway, brings to mind Milton's Areopagitica, published on this date in 1644:

We can grow ignorant again, brutish, formal and slavish...Give me the liberty to know, to utter, and to argue freely according to conscience, above all liberties.

Free to know what Dr Carson thinks he knows...


November 23, 2015 in Conscience, Constitution, Schmonstitution | Permalink | Comments (0)

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Wednesday, October 14, 2015

Get Thee To A Quakery

Church and State!  Whiskey!  Sexy!

At a General Court held at Boston, the 14th of October, 1656.

Whereas, there is a cursed sect of heretics, lately risen up in the world, which are commonly called quakers, who take upon them to be immediately sent from God, and infallibly assisted by the Spirit, to speak and write blasphemous opinions, despising government, and the order of God, in the church and commonwealth, speaking evil of dignities, reproaching and reviling magistrates and ministers, seeking to turn the people from the faith, and gain proselytes to their pernicious ways:

...be it ordered and enacted, that what master or commander of any ship, bark, pink, or ketch, shall henceforth bring into any harbour, creek, or cove, within this jurisdiction, any quaker or quakers, or other blasphemous heretics, shall pay, or cause to be paid, the fine of one hundred pounds to the treasurer of the country...

And it is hereby further ordered and enacted, that what quaker soever shall arrive in this country from foreign parts, or shall come into this jurisdiction from any parts adjacent, shall be forthwith committed to the house of correction; and, at their entrance, to be severely whipped, and by the master thereof be kept constantly to work, and none suffered to converse or speak with them, during the time of their imprisonment, which shall be no longer than necessity requires.

And it is ordered, if any person shall knowingly import into any harbour of this jurisdiction, any quakers' books or writings, concerning their devilish opinions, shall pay for such book or writing, being legally proved against him or them, the sum of five pounds;

and whosoever shall disperse or couceal any such book or writing, and it he found with him or her, or in his or her house, and shall not immediately deliver the same to the next magistrate, shall forfeit or pay five pounds, for the dispersing or concealing of any such book or writing.

And it is hereby further enacted, that if any person within this colony, shall take upon them to defend the heretical opinions of the quakers, or any of their books or papers, as aforesaid, if legally proved, shall be fined for the first time fort; shillings; if they shall persist in the same and shall again defend it the second time, four pounds; if notwithstanding they shall again defend and maintain the said quakers' heretical opinions, they shall be committed to the house of correction till there be convenient passage to send them out of the land, being sentenced by the court of Assistants to banishment.

Lastly, it is hereby ordered, that what person or persons soever, shall revile the persons of the magistrates or ministers, as is usual with the quakers, such person or persons shall be severely whipped, or pay the sum of five pounds.

As I've said before in response to whiners who claim they're being oppressed, just try being a Quaker in Puritan Massachussets in the 1650s.  Good times:

From 1656 through 1661, the Massachusetts Bay Colony experienced an “invasion” of Quaker missionaries, who were not deterred by the increasingly severe punishments enacted and inflicted by the colonial authorities. In October 1659, two (William Robinson and Marmaduke Stevenson) were hanged at Boston; in June 1660, Mary Dyar (or Dyer) became the third; in March 1661, William Leddra became the fourth (and last) to suffer capital punishment or “martyrdom” for their Quaker beliefs.

While members of the Society of Friends rushed to Massachusetts to test the harsh sentences under the newly enacted laws, other Friends in England simultaneously petitioned Parliament and the newly restored king for relief from this official persecution. When the Massachusetts General Court sent a petition to King Charles II explaining and defending their actions, Edward Burrough, a leading Quaker writer and controversialist, answered it with [a 32-page publication entitled A Declaration of the Sad and Great Persecution and Martyrdom of the People of God, called Quakers, in New-England, for the Worshipping of God]. Its first part is a point-bypoint refutation of the Massachusetts claims; its second part is a detailed list of the punishments, cruelties, and indignities suffered by Friends at the hands of the colonial authorities; its third section is a narrative description of the three executions of 1659 and 1660, including the public statements of the condemned. 

Burrough’s publication (and a subsequent audience with the king) led to Charles’ issuance of an order halting the punishments in the fall of 1661, although they were resumed, in only slightly less severe form, the following year.

The highlights:

  • 22 have been Banished upon pain of Death.
  • 03 have been M A R T Y R E D .
  • 03 have had their Right-Ears cut.
  • 01 hath been burned in the Hand with the letter H
  • 31 Persons have received 650 Stripes.
  • 01 was beat while his Body was like a jelly.


  • Several were beat with Pitched Ropes.
  • Five Appeals made by them to England, were denied by the Rulers of Boston.
  • One thousand fourty four pounds worth of Goods hath been taken from them (being poor men) for meeting together in the fear of the Lord, and for keeping the Commands of Christ.
  • One now lyeth in Iron-fetters, condemned to dye.

Call me when this starts happening to bigots.  Until then, they can fuck off.


October 14, 2015 in And Fuck..., Conscience | Permalink | Comments (1)

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Friday, September 25, 2015

When The Father Of The Constitution Loves The Bill Of Rights Very Much...


The Senate proceeded to consider the message from the House of Representatives of the 24th, wth amendments to the amendments of the Senate to "Articles to be proposed to the Legislatures of the several States, as amendments to the Constitution of the United States;" and, 

Resolved, That the Senate do concur in the amendments proposed by the Home of Representatives to the amendments of the Senate.

Yet this #SlatePitchEsque post ought remind even Kim Davis' lawyers that there are limits to our rights enumerated in those First Ten...


September 25, 2015 in Conscience, Constitution, Schmonstitution | Permalink | Comments (0)

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But What If Denying Civil Rights Is A Compelling State (Or County) Interest?

I mean, 10th Amendment and all that.  Plus, Dred Scott, amirite?!


September 25, 2015 in Conscience, Constitution, Schmonstitution | Permalink | Comments (1)

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Monday, September 07, 2015

Deuteronomy 17:12


Kim Davis, the Kentucky clerk who's refused to issue same-sex marriage licenses, on Monday asked the Kentucky governor to immediately free her from jail, according to court documents obtained by CNN.

"We would like them to release her from jail and provide reasonable, sensible accommodation so she can do her job," one of her lawyers, Horatio Mihet, said in a statement. "That would be taking her name off of marriage licenses in Rowan County and allowing her deputies to issue the licenses."

Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear's office said Monday he won't respond, noting that the conflict was a "matter between her and the courts."

She was the one who rejected the accommodation of allowing her clerks to issue the certificates.  Now she wants the Governor to engage in Executive Tyranny and ignore the Rule of Law?


September 7, 2015 in Conscience, Constitution, Schmonstitution | Permalink | Comments (1)

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Sunday, September 06, 2015

Don't Get Me Started On That Tyrannical Huckabee

Ah, I see our modern GOP's dedication to the Rule of Law:

Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee (R) said on Sunday that U.S. citizens only have to follow court orders if judges get “it right,” and that he would follow his conscience as president even if it meant the type of jail time Kentucky county clerk Kim Davis is serving.

Speaking with host George Stephanopolous, the GOP presidential candidate claimed court orders only become binding upon citizens when state or federal legislatures take the ruling and codify it into law.
“Well, you obey it if it’s right. So I go back to my question. Is slavery the law of the land?” Huckabee attempted as way of an explanation. “Should it have been the law of the land because Dred Scott said so? Was that a correct decision? Should the courts have been irrevocably followed on that? Should Lincoln have been put in jail? Because he ignored it.”

Turning to presidents following their conscience, Stephanopolous played a clip of President John F. Kennedy in 1960 stating: “When if the time should ever come and I do not concede any conflict to be remotely possible, when my office would require me to either violate my conscience or violate the national interest, then I would resign the office.”

“Would you make that same statement in your candidacy for president?” the host asked Huckabee.

“I can’t see any circumstance in which I would be required to violate my conscience and — and the law,” Huckabee conceded before adding, “And if so, I think maybe there is a point at which you say either I’ll resign or put me in jail.”

Slavery was not the law because of Taney, but rather because of the Constitution, which also provides for a judiciary to do its job.  And a certain a conservative, anti-gay judge actually did just that when another government official tried to impose her religion upon her constituents instead of doing her fucking job.

But at least Huckster has given Obama a pass on all his executive actions...


September 6, 2015 in Conscience, Constitution, Schmonstitution | Permalink | Comments (3)

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Thursday, September 03, 2015

Not Everybody Can Be A Martyr

County Bigot Davis is enjoying the amenities of the State.  That's the extent of her profit from her criminal activity: she will not become a rich martyr.


September 3, 2015 in Conscience | Permalink | Comments (0)

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Balancing Act

Marco Rubio:

We should seek a balance between government’s responsibility to abide by the laws of our republic and allowing people to stand by their religious convictions. While the clerk’s office has a governmental duty to carry out the law, there should be a way to protect the religious freedom and conscience rights of individuals working in the office.

We have a balance already: government officials abide by the law when in their office, and exercise their religious freedom everywhere else.  Easy peasy!


September 3, 2015 in Conscience, Constitution, Schmonstitution | Permalink | Comments (0)

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Tuesday, September 01, 2015

So Help Me G-d

Bless her heart:

After being rebuffed by the Supreme Court and therefore exhausting the appeals process, Kentucky county clerk Kim Davis denied a marriage license to a gay couple today for the fifth time since the legalization of same-sex marriage. Davis is part of a small group of county clerks who claim that their interpretation of divine law trumps their responsibilities as public officials. Demanding that one couple seeking a marriage license leave her office, Davis said that she is acting “under God’s authority.”

She forgot whose authority is at issue, which she swore an oath to uphold:

I...will faithfully execute the duties of my office without favor, affection or partiality...

Do your fucking job, resign on principle, or suffer the sanctions, you obstinate piece of shit.


PS--The KY Leg can remove her, but is currently not in session.

September 1, 2015 in And Fuck..., Conscience, Constitution, Schmonstitution | Permalink | Comments (6)

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Friday, August 21, 2015

Friends At War

Then I heard the voice of the Lord saying, “Whom shall I send, and who will go for us?” And I said, “Here am I; send me!”

 Isaiah 6:8

The other day on Facebook I shared something from Friends Journal wherein they inquired as to what themes readers might be interested in.  I mused about why some Quakers go to war and how their Meetings deal with it.

Today this post from a few weeks ago popped up:

As I engaged more deeply with the gospels and discovered more about the witness of peacemakers like John Woolman, Henry David Thoreau, Daniel Berrigan, Mohandas Gandhi, and Martin Luther King Jr., the latent longing for peace awakened within me. My conviction grew that Jesus really meant what he said on the Sermon on the Mount and the spirit of Christ has continually called the Friends and saints of God to realize the possibilities of peace on earth. I began to speak more openly about this conviction. But the stronger my convincement became, the harder it was to know how to respectfully relate to my friends and family who were service members.

It was at my current meeting that I began to understand how real this tension is within service members and veterans themselves. During a conversation, a member of our meeting who is a Vietnam veteran told me about his struggle to find a church that could “speak to his condition.” One of his most telling statements helped me see what Friendly work may be needed with veterans: “It felt like [to the churches I visited] I was either a monster or a hero.” This connected with my experience of many churches, including Quaker meetings. Too often, meetings have trouble distinguishing the wars they oppose from the men and women who are asked to fight them, seeing them as monsters. Other churches want to honor the service of veterans and their willingness to “lay down one’s life for their friends” (John 15:13) and can only relate to them as heroes. Neither of these extreme labels fits the experience of most veterans. Veterans are like most other folks in that they have mixed emotions about their life choices and experiences. They carry a mix of pride and shame, joy and regret. Veterans need Quaker meetings that are able to navigate a “third way” beyond the labels of monster and hero and create a hospitable space where they can attend to the leading of the Light. They need a safe space where their wounds can be healed, their stories can be heard, and their gifts can be shared.

There is new language that helps us understand the spiritual and psychological trauma faced by so many veterans. We not only hear about post-traumatic stress, traumatic brain injury, and military sexual trauma, we are now hearing about moral injury. Moral injury happens when there is a deep violation of one’s conscience and moral center. The violence and trauma becomes internalized within the service member, and there is a need for healing and cleansing. Many ancient cultures had rituals and healers who were practiced at integrating warriors back into the community, but those communal structures have largely broken down. Perhaps this is a unique invitation and opportunity for Friends. We do not believe in war; we oppose war and want to end it. But we do believe in peace, and if we want to be faithful to that testimony, we must address violence in all its forms: external violence between groups and nations and internal violence within those who experience the trauma of war. The realities of moral injury call us to a ministry of soul repair. Perhaps this is the “third way” to which we are being led.

We Quakers have never been afraid of tension, any more than Dr King was.  Nor is the Society of Friends monolithic, any more than the Civil Rights Movement is.


August 21, 2015 in Conscience | Permalink | Comments (0)

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Wednesday, August 12, 2015

The Quaker And The Gadget

A Quaker reflects on his father's involvement in the Manhattan Project.  It's not clear to me if dad was a Friend himself, but I will note once again that some of us do, in fact, get involved in wars in various ways, because anybody can get to the point where evil seems impossible overcome without violence. 


August 12, 2015 in Conscience, Pax Americana | Permalink | Comments (1)

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Tuesday, June 30, 2015

God Loves Fags!

Well, some of Her churches do, at least.  People ought to remember that.


June 30, 2015 in Conscience | Permalink | Comments (0)

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Monday, June 29, 2015

Conscience Has Consequences


A county clerk in Arkansas intends to resign from her position because she doesn't believe in issuing marriage licenses to same-sex couples.

Cleburne County Clerk Dana Guffey said Monday that she intends to step down June 30, according to ArkansasOnline, because she has a moral objection to same-sex marriage. 

If you can't do your job, find another.  Don't try to use the Bible--or MLK--as a Get Out Of Work Free card.


PS--Here's somebody who apparently read all her Bible:

Over the weekend, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton suggested that local clerks with religious objections could opt-out of granting marriage licenses to gay couples in light of the Supreme Court's decision legalizing same-sex marriage. But at least one Texas clerk who opposes gay marriage on religious grounds doesn't see a need for the exemption.

“Personally, same-sex marriage is a contradiction to my faith and belief that marriage is between one man and one woman,” Denton County Clerk Juli Luke said in a statement Sunday, according to the the Denton Record-Chronicle. “However, first and foremost, I took an oath on my family Bible to uphold the law, and as an elected public official, my personal belief cannot prevent me from issuing the licenses as required.”

Her clerk's office oversaw its first gay marriage Monday morning, the Denton Record-Chronicle. The couple, Sara Bollinger and Whitney Hennen, received their license a little after 8 a.m.

Let her light so shine before Texas officials, that they may see her good works, and glorify their Father which is in heaven...

June 29, 2015 in Conscience | Permalink | Comments (0)

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Monday, June 22, 2015

It's Almost Like You Have To Push Pols To Do Stuff


  • I think Haley merits praise for this action.  People called for South Carolina to take down the flag.  She called for it to be taken down.  I, myself, take yes for an answer.  (And while she’s not running again, plenty of public officials in the South who have safe seats or aren’t running again haven’t done the right thing.)
  • Yes, she had to be pushed by a horrible event.  But as Coates says, when it comes to politicians this is very nearly a tautology.  (You think  LBJ would have had a major record of accomplishment on civil rights had he been elected president in 1952?)  Politicians, up to and including Lincoln, act in politically expedient ways, and doing so is integral to progressive success.

Power concedes nothing something something something...


June 22, 2015 in Conscience | Permalink | Comments (0)

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Wednesday, April 22, 2015

Some Vax Sanity In Vermont's Senate

Glad the Senate passed the anti-anti-vaxxer legislation, but man:

Chittenden Sen. David Zuckerman opposed the plan because he thinks parents have a right to determine what's best for their children. "The important factor for me is that the human body itself, our body, is our one vessel that we have complete control over,” he says. “Considering there is evidence of individuals having basically allergic reactions to shots, if we ... force everybody to have them, there are a percentage of our population for whom we are forcing to have these kinds of reactions." 

I used to buy veggies from Zuckerman, and have had cordial exchanges with him over the years on legislative issues--we agree on many, many things.  A bit disappointed that he thinks belief trumps public health, particularly since the percentage of allergic reactions is vanishingly small, and the medical exemption remains.

Of course, people of conscience aren't being forced to do anything, but rather being offered a choice: do what's right for the body politic, or keep your kids home.  It's not like jackbooted thugs are coming to your house and poking your kids full of holes.

Anyway, back to the House, who hopefully will not punt on the issue again.


April 22, 2015 in Conscience | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

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Monday, April 06, 2015

New Anti-gay Business Model


Cake/Flower/Pizza Movement Grows!

A spurt of giving in recent days has racked up 85,000 in gofundme.com contributions for a Washington state florist who was fined $1000 for refusing to sell flowers for a wedding of a gay couple.

Just a few quick hits:

  1. If you really have the courage of your convictions, violate the law (contrary to Romans 13), take the fine, and accept that as just another cost of doing business instead of whining.

  2. This shows that "sane" businesses will, in fact, always turn away customers they don't like.  Already proved during Jim Crow, clearly the "free market" doesn't correct discrimination, especially when there are plenty of rubes to contribute.

  3. I wonder how sustainable the "I'm being persecuted, give me money" model is.  Could Quakers engaged in war tax resistance get the same level of support?  Asking for a Friend.

Alternately, just bake the fucking cake.


April 6, 2015 in Conscience | Permalink | Comments (2) | TrackBack

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Friday, April 03, 2015

A Different Color Of Sin

Sounds like somebody is a Cafeteria Christian:

CNN’s Gary Tuchman visited several florists in rural Georgia and asked if they would provide certain services to gay people. Of course they all said no… because Jesus.

The most telling part of the exchange was this one with florist Melissa Jeffcoat in which she was confronted about the specifics of her bigotry:

Tuchman: … In the Ten Commandments, it says you can’t commit adultery…

Jeffcoat: Right.

Tuchman: It says you need to honor your father and mother.

Jeffcoat: Mhmm.

TuchmanIf someone didn’t honor their parents or committed adultery, would you serve them?


TuchmanWell, why would you serve them but not serve someone who is gay?

JeffcoatIt’s just a different kind of sin to me and I just don’t believe in it.

Good to know the Ten Commandments are just guidelines now!

Regardless, it is a bit unfair to make an attack on this religious component because there are, in fact, different levels of sin according to some folks' traditions (e.g., venial v mortal sins in Catholicism).  It's not hypocritical or even really cherry-picking, but a way of looking at human experience through a particular lens.

Naturally I think that a private behavior is none of these florists' fucking business and harms them not at all as compared to something like greed or incest, which can have a significant societal cost.  But it's also not generally my business what other people believe, unless they try to enshrine it in law or try to use it as an excuse to not follow anti-discrimination law (hello, Romans?).

And then I read this:

There is no doubt that many Christians truly think that by refusing to cater to same-sex marriages, they are simply being faithful to their religious tradition. They’re wrong. But they’re wrong because they lack self-knowledge, not because they are expressing socially unpopular views. And as fun as it may be to publicly sneer at their ignorance and to attribute it to malice, it may be more effective to nudge them toward self-examination, to offer a kind of amnesty for their sins of omission.

You all know that I'm one who enjoys ridicule, and I have no deep sympathy for Memories Pizza in the face of all that backlash (which appears to have turned out quite well for them anyway).  I don't abide threats, but the snark and such are an understandable reaction from people who have suffered from very real persecution.

That said, I can't help but think of Jesus and the Disinherited:

The religion of Jesus says to the disinherited: "Love your enemy.  Take the initiative in seeking ways by which you can have the experience of a common sharing of mutual worth and value.  It may be hazardous, but you must do it."
What one discovers in even a single experience in which barriers have been removed may become useful in building an over-all technique for loving one's enemy.  There cannot be too great insistence on the point that we are here dealing with a discipline, a method, a technique, as over against some form of wishful thinking or simply desiring.

If I might edit some of Thurman's words: 

For the [gay rights advocate] it means that he must see the individual [discriminating vendor] in the context of common humanity.  The fact that a particular individual is [religious], and therefore may be regarded in some over-all sense as the [political] enemy, must be faced; and opportunity must be provided, found, or created for freeing such an individual from his "[hetero] necessity."  From this point on, the relationship becomes like any other primary one.
A whole group may be regarded as an exception, and thus one is relieved of any necessity to regard them as human beings.  A [gay rights advocate] may say: "If a man is [religious], he may be automatically classified as one incapable of dealing with me as if he were a rational human being."  Or it may be just the reverse.  Such a mood, the mood of exception, operates in all sorts of ways...The deadly consequences of this attitude are evident.  On the same principle scapegoats are provided, upon whose helpless heads we pour our failures and our fears.

I still won't tolerate anti-gay bigotry any more than I do racism, but maybe the kind of sin of a baker or florist answering hypotheticals is different from the Klan or Illinois Nazis marching or committing acts of violence, or even a governor signing a discriminatory law.  We probably could cut them a little slack and take advantage of the teachable moment instead of giving them a chance to play the martyr card.


April 3, 2015 in Conscience | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

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Wednesday, April 01, 2015

Since America Is A Judeo-Christian Nation, I Hear Tell

The Christians in Indiana should remember Hillel:

[A] Gentile came to Shamai saying: "Convert me on the condition that thou teach me the whole Torah while I stand on one foot." Shamai pushed him away with the builders' measure he held in his hand. He thereupon came to Hillel, and the latter accepted him. He told him: "What is hateful to thee, do not unto thy fellow; this is the whole law. All the rest is a commentary to this law; go and learn it."

You know, the Golden Pizza Rule, and all that...


April 1, 2015 in Conscience | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

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Friday, March 27, 2015

Speaking Of Friendly Boycotts

American Friend Service Committee on something dear to my heart:

In the context of Israel and Palestine AFSC supports the the use of boycott and divestment campaigns targeting only companies that support the occupation, settlements, militarism, or any other violations of international humanitarian or human rights law. Our position does not call for a full boycott of Israel nor of companies because they are either Israeli or doing business in Israel.  Our actions also never focus on individuals.

Our support for the use of boycotts and divestments is contextualized by Quakers and AFSC's long support for boycotts, divestment, and sanctions as economic tactics that appeal to human conscience and change behavior. In the 1800s, Quakers helped lead the “Free Produce Movement,” a boycott of goods produced using slave labor. In recent times, AFSC has participated in boycott and divestment campaigns connected to the in the civil rights, anti-apartheid, farm worker, and prison rights struggles.

Since 1948 AFSC has worked with both Palestinians and Israelis to achieving a just and lasting peace and we remain committed to supporting nonviolent activism designed to achieve this end. Taking into account AFSC principles and history, AFSC supports all nonviolent efforts to realize peace and justice in Israel and Palestine including the strategic use of boycott, divestment, and sanctions tactics.

For some reason, lots of Soda Stream crap has been popping up in my feeds, so I felt compelled to remind people that they are very, very bad and should not be supported by all right thinking people.


March 27, 2015 in Conscience, Pax Americana, Viva Palestina | Permalink | Comments (0) | TrackBack

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Thursday, March 26, 2015

A Day Of Prayer And Fasting For Indiana

Bobby is a good friend and Friend, but I think misses the mark here:

I am not a fan of boycotts; they rarely work and harm innocent people who depend on the boycotted industry or place.

Part of the point is to harm people in a nonviolent, recoverable way so they see the impact of their (in)action in the face of grave injustice.  And boycotts enjoy a long, effective history.

Anyway, my buddy continues:

However, it would be very un-Quakerly to embarrass the good religious people of Indiana by giving them my gay business or my gay money, so I will not put them in the awkward position of having to accept it as long as this legalized gay-bashing is in place. I’m sure they will understand that I’m doing them a big favor.

It sort of reminds me of this scene from Gandhi.  Yes, I compared a blogger to the Mahatma.


March 26, 2015 in Conscience, Pax Americana | Permalink | Comments (5) | TrackBack